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Vitamin C vs. Vitamin C with R-Lipoic Acid: Which Best Fits Different Clinical Settings?

Vitamin C vs. Vitamin C with R-Lipoic Acid: Which Best Fits Different Clinical Settings?

The antioxidants vitamin C and lipoic acid both deliver many benefits, but which best fits different clinical settings? Here we will address when each of these antioxidant therapies may be appropriate.

Vitamin C: Broad-based support for immune function, antioxidant status, mood, and tissue health

Although many only think of vitamin C as an immune-supportive agent and chose to take it as a supplement when they’ve fallen ill with a cold, vitamin C has many actions in the body beyond this. The importance of vitamin C was first recognized in the condition of scurvy, a disease associated with malnourishment that was found to be treatable with the consumption of citrus fruit, now known to contain high amounts of vitamin C. The broad symptoms of scurvy including malaise, fever, easy bruising, gum disease, mood changes, muscle pain and poor wound healing shed light on some of the important physiological roles of vitamin C.

 

Immune function. Supplementation with vitamin C has been observed to shorten the duration and severity of colds, and reduce the risk of developing a cold in people who routinely exercise at a high level of intensity.[i],[ii] As an immune-supportive agent, vitamin C has been shown to improve the function of natural killer cells as well as lymphocyte proliferation and migration to infections.[iii],[iv] Vitamin C also has been shown to have potential benefit in the setting of allergies and asthma as a natural histamine-reducing agent.[v]

Antioxidant. The importance of vitamin C goes far beyond immune function, as vitamin C is an antioxidant and a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions. As an antioxidant, vitamin C has been shown to scavenge free radicals, inhibit lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, and support the body’s levels of other crucial antioxidants such as vitamin E and glutathione.[vi],[vii] Increased levels of oxidative stress may contribute to pathology and dysfunction associated with depression,[viii] metabolic syndrome,[ix] autoimmunity,[x] cardiovascular disease,[xi] and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.[xii]

Mood. Vitamin C is an important cofactor for the synthesis of several hormones and neurotransmitters made in the adrenal gland. Perhaps not surprisingly, the adrenal glands are one of the organs with the highest concentration of vitamin C.[xiii] Ascorbic acid enhances the production of norepinephrine from dopamine,[xiv] while deficiency has been shown to be associated with lower levels of dopamine and serotonin metabolites.[xv] Low plasma ascorbic acid levels have been shown to be associated with major depression.[xvi] Vitamin C has been shown to positively impact symptoms of anxiety and depression in double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, possibly attributable to its action as an antioxidant.[xvii],[xviii]

Tissue health. Vitamin C is critical for the health of many tissues in the body, as it plays a role in collagen formation. Tissues containing collagen include not only the cartilage, tendons, and ligaments of the joints, but also the skin, gums, blood vessels, bones, intervertebral disks, gut, and muscle. Vitamin C has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis, particularly that of Type I and Type III collagen.[xix],[xx] Although severe deficiency leading to scurvy is uncommon, symptoms such as easy bruising and oral mucosa changes associated with vitamin C deficiency are still clinically seen.[xxi]

R-Lipoic Acid: Central nervous system protector, mitochondrial nutrient, antioxidant, and chelator

At times, it may be appropriate to bring lipoic acid on board with vitamin C. The use of lipoic acid has been studied in broad array of settings: peripheral neuropathy, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, hepatitis, obesity, heavy metal toxicity, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, migraines, multiple sclerosis, and more.[xxii] As we understand how each of these conditions has aspects of pathology that are attributable to oxidative damage, the potential benefits of this antioxidant should not be surprising. Lipoic acid has been shown to extend the activity of vitamins C and E, also raising ubiquinol and intracellular glutathione.[xxiii],[xxiv] Mechanistically, lipoic acid has been shown to impact endothelial and mitochondrial function – factors which also may play into many of these conditions.[xxv] Lipoic acid crosses the blood-brain barrier which is why its benefits as an antioxidant have been studied in so many neurodegenerative conditions.[xxvi]

What form of lipoic acid is best? Lipoic acid is a molecule with two possible isomers: the R- and the S- form, referred to herein as R-LA and S-LA. Supplementation of lipoic acid as R-LA has been observed to be more bioavailable than the S-LA form.[xxvii] Higher plasma levels of lipoic acid can be achieved when it is supplied as a sodium salt form (sodium R-lipoate) and when taken away from food.[xxviii],[xxix] Maximum plasma levels of lipoic acid with traditional oral dosing (capsules, tablets) have been observed between 10 – 60 minutes after administration, with a plasma half-life of 30 minutes.[xxx],[xxxi] However, some of the effects seen with lipoic acid supplementation are observed up to 24h after oral administration, particularly pertaining to other markers of antioxidant status.[xxxii]

Antioxidant and chelation effects. Lipoic acid is converted to its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) by different enzymes within the mitochondria and cytosol, and from DHLA to further metabolites. As an oxidant couple, lipoic acid and DHLA have both lipophilic and hydrophilic properties.[xxxiii] Both the reduced and oxidized forms have the capability of acting as an antioxidant (with DHLA being the more active form), and together are able to reduce a multitude of free radical species.[xxxiv] The lipoic acid-DHLA duo has evidence as a chelator of redox-active metals in vitro and in vivo.[xxxv] Again, because lipoic acid is able to cross the blood brain barrier, the benefits of it as a chelator are seen in conditions affecting the central nervous system as well.[xxxvi] Not only does lipoic acid support the removal of these damaging metals, it simultaneously supports antioxidant levels in the setting of heavy metal toxicity.[xxxvii] Other stronger chelators such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) are thus well supported by the addition of lipoic acid for reducing metal burden while maintaining antioxidant balance during chelation therapy.

 

 

Author, Dr. Carrie Decker 

Dr. Decker is a certified Naturopathic Doctor, graduating with honors from the National College of Natural Medicine (now the National University of Natural Medicine) in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Decker also has graduate degrees in biomedical and mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign respectfully. Dr. Decker sees patients at her office in Portland, OR, as well as remotely, with a focus on gastrointestinal disease, mood imbalances, eating disorders, autoimmune disease, chronic fatigue, and skin conditions. Dr. Decker also supports integrative medicine education as a writer and a contributor to various resources.


[i] Hemilä H, Chalker E. Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Jan 31;1:CD000980. View Abstract

[ii] Hemilä H. Vitamin C and common cold incidence: a review of studies with subjects under heavy physical stress. Int J Sports Med. 1996 Jul;17(5):379-83. View Full Paper

[iii] Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb YB, et al. Role of vitamins D, E and C in immunity and inflammation. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2013; 27(2):291-295. View Abstract

[iv] Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb YB, et al. Role of vitamins D, E and C in immunity and inflammation. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2013; 27(2):291-295. View Abstract

[v] Hagel AF, et al. Intravenous infusion of ascorbic acid decreases serum histamine concentrations in patients with allergic and non-allergic diseases. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol. 2013 Sep 1;386(9):789-93. View Abstract

[vi] Bendich A, et al. The antioxidant role of vitamin C. Adv Free Radic Biol Med. 1986 Dec;2(2):419-44. View Abstract

[vii] Meister A. Glutathione-ascorbic acid antioxidant system in animals. J Biol Chem. 1994 Apr 1;269(13):9397-400. View Full Paper

[viii] Moylan S, et al. Oxidative & nitrosative stress in depression: why so much stress? Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2014 Sep;45:46-62. View Abstract

[ix] Furukawa S, et al. Increased oxidative stress in obesity and its impact on metabolic syndrome. J Clin Invest. 2004 Dec;114(12):1752-61. View Full Paper

[x] Perricone C, De Carolis C, Perricone R. Glutathione: a key player in autoimmunity. Autoimmun Rev. 2009 Jul;8(8):697-701. View Abstract

[xi] Cai H, Harrison DG. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases: the role of oxidant stress. Circ Res. 2000 Nov 10;87(10):840-4. View Full Paper

[xii] Coyle JT, Puttfarcken P. Oxidative stress, glutamate, and neurodegenerative disorders. Science. 1993 Oct 29;262(5134):689-95. View Abstract

[xiii] Patak P, Willenberg HS, Bornstein SR. Vitamin C is an important cofactor for both adrenal cortex and adrenal medulla. Endocr Res. 2004 Nov;30(4):871-5. View Abstract

[xiv] May JM, et al. Ascorbic acid efficiently enhances neuronal synthesis of norepinephrine from dopamine. Brain Res Bull. 2013 Jan;90:35-42. View Full Paper

[xv] Ward MS, et al. Behavioral and monoamine changes following severe vitamin C deficiency. J Neurochem. 2013 Feb;124(3):363-75. View Full Paper

[xvi] Khanzode SD, et al. Oxidative damage and major depression: the potential antioxidant action of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Redox Rep. 2003;8(6):365-70. View Abstract

[xvii] de Oliveira IJ, et al. Effects of Oral Vitamin C Supplementation on Anxiety in Students: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Pak J Biol Sci. 2015 Jan;18(1):11-8. View Abstract

[xviii] Amr M, et al. Efficacy of vitamin C as an adjunct to fluoxetine therapy in pediatric major depressive disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Nutr J. 2013 Mar;12(1):1. View Full Paper

[xix] Pinnell SR. Regulation of collagen biosynthesis by ascorbic acid: a review. Yale J Biol Med. 1985 Nov-Dec;58(6):553-9. View Full Paper

[xx] Tajima S, Pinnell SR. Ascorbic acid preferentially enhances type I and III collagen gene transcription in human skin fibroblasts. J Dermatol Sci. 1996 Mar;11(3):250-3. View Abstract

[xxi] Olmedo JM, et al. Scurvy: a disease almost forgotten. Int J Dermatol. 2006 Aug;45(8):909-13. View Abstract

[xxii] Packer L, et al. Molecular aspects of lipoic acid in the prevention of diabetes complications. Nutrition 2001;17:888-895. View Abstract

[xxiii] Packer L, et al. Molecular aspects of lipoic acid in the prevention of diabetes complications. Nutrition 2001;17:888-895. View Abstract

[xxiv] Packer L, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.  Free Radical Bio Med 1995;19:227-250. View Abstract

[xxv] Liu J. The effects and mechanisms of mitochondrial nutrient alpha-lipoic acid on improving age-associated mitochondrial and cognitive dysfunction: an overview. Neurochem Res. 2008 Jan;33(1):194-203. View Abstract

[xxvi] Packer L, Tritschler HJ, Wessel K. Neuroprotection by the metabolic antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid. Free Radic Biol Med. 1997;22(1-2):359-78. View Abstract

[xxvii] Hermann, R., et al. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of different racemic α-lipoic acid formulations in healthy volunteers. Eur J Pharm Sci 1996;4:167-174. View Abstract

[xxviii] Carlson DA, et al. The plasma pharmacokinetics of R-(+)-lipoic acid administered as sodium R-(+)-lipoate to healthy human subjects. Alt Med Rev 2007;12:343-351. View Full Paper

[xxix] Gleiter CH, et al. Influence of food intake on the bioavailability of thioctic acid enantiomers (letter). Eur J Pharm Sci 1996;50:513-514. View Full Paper

[xxx] Breithaupt-Grögler K, et al. Dose-proportionality of oral thioctic acid—coincidence of assessments via pooled plasma and individual data. Eur J Pharm Sci 1999;8:57-65.View Abstract

[xxxi] Teichert J, et al. Plasma kinetics, metabolism, and urinary excretion of alpha‐lipoic acid following oral administration in healthy volunteers. J Clin Pharmacol 2003;43:1257-1267.View Abstract

[xxxii] Moini H, et al.  R-alpha-lipoic acid action on cell redox status, the insulin receptor, and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.  Arch Biochem Biophys. 2002;397:384-91. View Abstract

[xxxiii] Moini H, et al. Antioxidant and prooxidant activities of α-lipoic acid and dihydrolipoic acid. Toxicol Appl Pharm 2002;182:84-90. View Abstract

[xxxiv] Packer L, et al. Molecular aspects of lipoic acid in the prevention of diabetes complications. Nutrition 2001;17:888-895.View Abstract

[xxxv] Shay KP, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid as a dietary supplement: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic potential. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2009 Oct;1790(10):1149-60. View Full Paper

[xxxvi] Bush AI. Metal complexing agents as therapies for Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2002 Nov-Dec;23(6):1031-8. View Abstract

[xxxvii] Gurer H, et al. Antioxidant role of alpha-lipoic acid in lead toxicity. Free Radic Biol Med. 1999 Jul;27(1-2):75-81. View Abstract

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The Use of Glutathione, Master Antioxidant in Clinical Settings

The Use of Glutathione, Master Antioxidant in Clinical Settings

Even if you are not doing a deep dive into detoxification protocols, there is a vast array of clinical settings in which glutathione may impact health conditions

No matter what clinical setting your medical or nutrition-focused practice is in, the antioxidant glutathione has undoubtedly been a topic of discussion. Collectively, we understand that glutathione is the body’s main antioxidant and therefore the master detoxifier.[i] However, a simple statement of such, albeit grandiose, fails to capture the vast array of health conditions that glutathione may impact. Clinically, glutathione has importance in settings ranging from mental health to viral infections to heavy metal detoxification. It is worthy of a moment or two to highlight the research and clinical studies surrounding glutathione, and how the body’s glutathione status may impact various health conditions. 

Typical oral delivery of glutathione is greatly inhibited by breakdown in the stomach and minimally impacts intracellular levels. Thus, much research pertaining to glutathione involves the use of other substances which support intracellular glutathione levels.[ii] N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is one example, as this compound primarily has antioxidant benefits due to replenishing glutathione.[iii] Liposomal delivery systems protect glutathione from breakdown in the digestive system that otherwise prevents absorption of oral glutathione supplements. Additionally, the phospholipid-encapsulated sphere which delivers glutathione into the cell simultaneously replenishes and nourishes the cell by providing phospholipids of which cellular membranes are comprised. In cell cultures, liposomal glutathione has been demonstrated to be 100 times more efficiency for intracellular delivery than non-liposomal glutathione.[iv] 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the development and clinical manifestation of autism.[v],[vi] Children on the autistic spectrum have been shown to have lower levels of glutathione, which may be caused by metabolic abnormalities and nutritional deficiencies, but also may further contribute to them.[vii] In addition to this, significantly lower levels of phospholipids have been reported in children with autism.[viii] Supplemental NAC and glutathione have been studied specifically in the setting of ASD, and have been shown to increase glutathione levels.[ix],[x] Utilization of glutathione in a liposomal format also provides the essential phospholipids which may be deficient and are necessary for mitochondrial and cellular repair.

Attention deficit and mood disorders

Increased oxidative stress may contribute to attention deficit and mood disorders via numerous mechanisms.[xi],[xii] Therapies directed at supporting antioxidant levels such as NAC, vitamin C, and a pine back extract known as pycogenol have been studied in conditions of anxiety, depression, and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [xiii],[xiv],[xv],[xvi] With therapies such as these, improvements have been seen clinically, possibly associated with their impact on glutathione levels.[xvii] Of course, this has thus become a topic of interest for those involved in development of pharmaceutical therapies, however substantial evidence exists for one to consider utilizing these nutritional substances, as well as glutathione, which already are readily available.

Autoimmune disease and immune balance

In settings of autoimmune disease, there is an increased level of oxidative stress associated with immune activation and related inflammation. With this, glutathione levels become depleted.[xviii] Glutathione is integral to the proper function of our immune system, especially for resistance to viruses.[xix],[xx] Experimentally, a Th2 dominant (allergic state) is created with depletion of intracellular glutathione, and introduction of glutathione restores immune balance.[xxi] Given these relationships it is easy to see how supplemental glutathione may be supportive for balancing immune function, in addition to restoring levels which often are deficient in autoimmunity.

Mercury and cellular toxicity

Glutathione is necessary for cellular detoxification. The process of Phase II detoxification involves the binding of toxins with substances such as glutathione to create larger, inactive, water soluble molecules.[xxii] Toxins such as mercury are linked to glutathione, transported out of the cell, into the bile, and out of the body via stool. Glutathione is thus necessary to both protect the cell’s delicate chemical machinery and to transport toxins out. Because glutathione is utilized for the removal and elimination of mercury and other toxins from the cell, it also can become depleted in settings of toxicity.[xxiii]

 

Author, Dr. Carrie Decker 

Dr. Decker is a certified Naturopathic Doctor, graduating with honors from the National College of Natural Medicine (now the National University of Natural Medicine) in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Decker also has graduate degrees in biomedical and mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign respectfully. Dr. Decker sees patients at her office in Portland, OR, as well as remotely, with a focus on gastrointestinal disease, mood imbalances, eating disorders, autoimmune disease, chronic fatigue, and skin conditions. Dr. Decker also supports integrative medicine education as a writer and a contributor to various resources.


[i] Devasagayam TP, et al. Free radicals and antioxidants in human health: current status and future prospects. J Assoc Physicians India. 2004 Oct;52:794-804. View Abstract

[ii] Exner R, et al. Therapeutic potential of glutathione. Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift. 2000 Jul;112(14):610-6. View Abstract

[iii] Rushworth GF, Megson IL. Existing and potential therapeutic uses for N-acetylcysteine: the need for conversion to intracellular glutathione for antioxidant benefits. Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Feb;141(2):150-9. View Abstract

[iv] Zeevalk GD, Bernard LP, Guilford FT. Liposomal-glutathione provides maintenance of intracellular glutathione and neuroprotection in mesencephalic neuronal cells. Neurochem Res. 2010 Oct;35(10):1575-87. View Abstract

[v] James SJ, et al.  Metabolic biomarkers of increased oxidative stress and impaired methylation capacity in children with autism. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1611-7. View Full Paper

[vi] Palmieri L, Persico AM. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders: cause or effect? Biochim Biophys Acta. 2010 Jun-Jul;1797(6-7):1130-7. View Abstract

[vii] Omata Y, et al. Decreased zinc availability affects glutathione metabolism in neuronal cells and in the developing brain. Toxicol Sci. 2013 May;133(1):90-100. View Abstract

[viii] El-Ansary AK, et al. Impaired plasma phospholipids and relative amounts of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in autistic patients from Saudi Arabia. Lipids Health Dis. 2011 Apr 22;10:63. View Full Paper

[ix] Hardan AY, et al. A randomized controlled pilot trial of oral N-acetylcysteine in children with autism. Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jun 1;71(11):956-61. View Full Paper

[x] Kern JK, et al. A clinical trial of glutathione supplementation in autism spectrum disorders. Med Sci Monit. 2011 Dec;17(12):CR677-82. View Full Paper

[xi] Ross MA. Could oxidative stress be a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders? Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2000 Jul-Aug;63(1-2):61-3. View Abstract

[xii] Moylan S, Berk M, Dean OM, et al. Oxidative & nitrosative stress in depression: why so much stress? Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2014;45:46-62.View Abstract

[xiii] Dvořáková M, et al. The effect of polyphenolic extract from pine bark, Pycnogenol® on the level of glutathione in children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Redox Report. 2006 Aug 1;11(4):163-72. View Abstract

[xiv] Trebatická J, et al. Treatment of ADHD with French maritime pine bark extract, Pycnogenol®. Euro Child & Adol Psych. 2006 Sep 1;15(6):329-35. View Abstract

[xv] de Oliveira IJ, et al. Effects of Oral Vitamin C Supplementation on Anxiety in Students: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Pak J Biol Sci. 2015 Jan;18(1):11-8. View Abstract

[xvi] Amr M, et al. Efficacy of vitamin C as an adjunct to fluoxetine therapy in pediatric major depressive disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Nutr J. 2013 Mar;12(1):1. View Full Paper

[xvii] Berk M, et al. Glutathione: a novel treatment target in psychiatry. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2008 Jul;29(7):346-51. View Abstract

[xviii] Perricone C, et al. Glutathione: a key player in autoimmunity. Autoimmun Rev. 2009 Jul;8(8):697-701. View Abstract

[xix] Palamara AT, et al. Evidence for antiviral activity of glutathione: in vitro inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication. Antiviral Res. 1995 Jun;27(3):237-53. View Abstract

[xx] Cai J, et al. Inhibition of influenza infection by glutathione. Free Radic Biol Med. 2003 Apr 1;34(7):928-36. View Abstract

[xxi] Peterson JD, et al. Glutathione levels in antigen-presenting cells modulate Th1 versus Th2 response patterns. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Mar 17;95(6):3071-6. View Full Paper

[xxii] Zamek-Gliszczynski MJ, et al. Integration of hepatic drug transporters and phase II metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms of hepatic excretion of sulfate, glucuronide, and GSH metabolites. Eur J Pharm Sci. 2006 Apr;27(5):447-86. View Abstract

[xxiii] Patrick L. Mercury toxicity and antioxidants: Part 1: role of glutathione and alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of mercury toxicity. Altern Med Rev. 2002 Dec;7(6):456-71. View Full Paper

 

 

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Quicksilver Scientific will be at this year's Arnold EXPO March 2nd-5th

Quicksilver Scientific will be at this year's Arnold EXPO March 2nd-5th

Join us at the Greater Columbus Convention Center; Mar 2nd-5th, Booth #533, for the 2017 Arnold Sports Festival and Arnold Fitness EXPO. The EXPO features more than 1000 sports fitness and health vendors. Make sure to add us to your Arnold EXPO Tour.

Learn more by visiting http://arnold17.mapyourshow.com/7_0/exhibitor_details.cfm…

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Quicksilver Scientific Launches First Liposomal Multi-Vitamin

Quicksilver Scientific Launches First Liposomal Multi-Vitamin

Quicksilver Scientific Launches First Liposomal Multi-Vitamin

Using pharmaceutical-grade liposomal technology, Quicksilver Scientific has engineered an ultra-strength multi-vitamin called "Ultra Vitamin"

 
Quicksilver Scientific Logo (PRNewsFoto/Quicksilver Scientific)

 

LAFAYETTE, Colo.Feb. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Quicksilver Scientific and Dr. Christopher Shade, PhD, announce the newest addition to their elite line of complex pharmaceutical-grade liposomal supplement therapies – a multi-vitamin so complete, it truly can be deemed as "ULTRA VITAMIN". Up until now, only intravenous therapies have been able to achieve what the liposomal formulation that "Ultra Vitamin" is able to deliver in the convenience of an oral, liquid formula. 

Health practitioners interested in selling Ultra Vitamin and partnering with Quicksilver Scientific can visit www.quicksilverscientific.com/register.

Ultra Vitamin is the ultimate multi-vitamin blend. It starts by combining the water-soluble vitamins in the Quicksilver Scientific Methyl B complex and PuRx Vitamin C with core fat-solubles: vitamins A, D3, E, and K2 (as menaquinone-7). Not stopping there, the plant-extracted carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene-tomato complex are included to provide depth and breadth to the anti-oxidant activity. The Vitamin E forms include tocotrienols, which have superior antioxidant action and properties not observed with tocopherol forms of vitamin E. The activated forms of the B vitamins provide the factors necessary for healthy methylation processes without creating "methyl traps" or hypermethylation symptoms. Bringing this all together, the phospholipids from the liposomes support cellular membrane health and function. This combination of nutrients and advanced delivery will have your cells functioning on a whole new level.

The complete multivitamin and antioxidant blend that the Ultra Vitamin provides has been long-anticipated by core practitioners utilizing the Quicksilver Delivery Systems™. With oral dosing in a liquid form, Quicksilver Scientific's pharmaceutical-grade liposomes bring the intensive therapies of an in-office IV to your home, in a pleasant tasting liquid formula. 

ABOUT QUICKSILVER SCIENTIFIC – www.QuicksilverScientific.com 

Famous for bringing the cutting-edge technology of highly engineered pharmaceutical-grade liposomal delivery systems to supplement therapies, Quicksilver Scientific is a pioneering leader of quality and innovation in the nutraceutical industry. The Etheric Delivery™ Phospholipid Encapsulation System developed by Quicksilver Scientific brings what was once only achievable with intravenous therapy to the convenience of oral delivery.

Non-practitioners can purchase Ultra Vitamin on the retail website http://www.purxpressions.com

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. 
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

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Quicksilver in the News:

Quicksilver in the News:

A Collection of the Latest News Stories and Articles About Quicksilver Scientific:

 

The First Liposomal Vitamin

By Ingredients Wizard 

Quicksilver Scientific and Dr. Christopher Shade, PhD, announce the newest addition to their elite line of complex pharmaceutical-grade liposomal supplement therapies – a multi-vitamin so complete, it truly can be deemed as “ULTRA VITAMIN

http://ingredientswizard.com/home/first-liposomal-multi-vitamin/?utm_content=buffer7a837&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

Metals chemistry expertise sets its detox products apart, Quicksilver says

By Hank Schultz, 09-Feb-2017

An in-depth understanding of metals chemistry and an advanced liposomal delivery system are what puts Quicksilver Scientific ahead in the detoxification field, an executive says.

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Manufacturers/Metals-chemistry-expertise-sets-its-detox-products-apart-Quicksilver-says

 

 

 

 

 

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Quicksilver Scientific Engineers the Ultimate Energy Supplement

Quicksilver Scientific Engineers the Ultimate Energy Supplement

Quicksilver Scientific Engineers the Ultimate Energy Supplement

Using innovative techniques in pharmaceutical-grade liposomal technology

 
Quicksilver Scientific Logo (PRNewsFoto/Quicksilver Scientific)
 
 

LAFAYETTE, Colo.Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Quicksilver Scientific and Dr. Christopher Shade, PhD, are excited to introduce their newest liposomal energy complex that just may be the ONE supplement to meet all your energetic needs. This balanced nootropic and mitochondria-generating combination, known as "The One" brings a blend of herbs known as adaptogens together with naturally sourced compounds renowned for their metabolic and energy supporting properties. 

Health practitioners and nutraceutical vendors interested in selling "The One" and partnering with Quicksilver Scientific can visit www.quicksilverscientific.com

"The One" is an inspired formula combining the proprietary Sun Horse adaptogenic herbal blend as a broad plant-derived base to host the nutraceutical powerhouses Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ), CoQ10, trans resveratrol, and DeltaGOLD tocotrienols. This superblend is delivered in unilammelar bilayer liposomal vesicles to create exceptional bioavailability while also providing membrane-supporting phosphatidyl choline. PQQ and resveratrol support mitochondrial biogenesis (the production of mitochondria, the energy-generating units of all your cells), while CoQ10, tocotrienols, resveratrol, and PQQ support the body's antioxidant levels, targeting healthy mitochondrial function and generation of energy in the form of ATP. 

"The One" is the supplement of the future, bringing this powerhouse of energy-supportive ingredients directly to your bloodstream, in a liposomal delivery system that offers uncompromised absorption right to where you need it! Dr. Shade views "The One as a key component to the growing list of Quicksilver products: We work across complex fields of detoxification, immune regulation, and age management, and the one common factor to success in these realms is strong mitochondrial energy generation. I have been looking for the ultimate mitochondrial product for a long time and have been specifically working on PQQ delivery for 3 years. The One is the culmination of my search and efforts toward this goal."

ABOUT QUICKSILVER SCIENTIFIC – www.QuicksilverScientific.com

Famous for bringing the cutting-edge technology of highly engineered pharmaceutical-grade liposomal delivery systems to supplement therapies, Quicksilver Scientific is a pioneering leader of quality and innovation in the nutraceutical industry. 

Non-practitioners can visit the retail website http://www.purxpressions.com to purchase these new products.

For custom product development and white-labeling opportunities, contact  www.quicksilverscientific.com/home/contact-us

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
 This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Nutraceutical Company is Changing How We Take Supplements

Nutraceutical Company is Changing How We Take Supplements

Nutraceutical Company Discovers a Better Delivery System

Using pharmaceutical-grade liposomal technology, Quicksilver Scientific is helping people reach optimal health

 
Quicksilver Scientific Logo

 
 

LAFAYETTE, Colo.Jan. 31, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- World-renowned expert in detoxification and liposomal delivery systems, Dr. Christopher Shade, PhD, and Quicksilver Scientific, have found the next major technology in nutraceutical delivery systems. The secret?  …Advanced pharmaceutical-grade liposomes that provide the power of intravenous therapy with the convenience of oral delivery. 

Quicksilver Scientific offers a professional line of products. Health practitioners interested in partnering with Quicksilver Scientific to support their patient's health can visit www.quicksilverscientific.com/register.

In a true technological breakthrough, Quicksilver Delivery Systems™ have advanced the standards of the nutraceutical industry by incorporating innovative technology utilized in drug-delivery systems with supplement therapies, creating a nutraceutical line with unparalleled bioavailability. Correctly-made liposomal delivery systems provide improved systemic and cellular absorption of nutrients. Unlike traditional vitamins and dietary supplements that are often poorly absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, the nutritional therapies delivered in biocompatible liposomes of Quicksilver Delivery Systems™ have intraoral and lymphatic absorption, and impact systemic circulation in a way that until now only intravenous therapies could achieve. 

The purity of the liposomal products of the Quicksilver Delivery Systems™ line is unrivaled. Engineered at the same level as high-grade pharmaceuticals, these spheres measure within a range of 50–100nm, with tightly controlled sizing, verified in each batch by Laser Dynamic Light Scattering technology. Unilamellar (single-bilayer) lipid membranes composed of purified natural phospholipids sourced from sunflower and soy lecithin form the exterior of the liposomal particles. These phospholipids fuse with cell membranes, facilitating efficient intracellular delivery and additionally supporting cellular membrane function and signaling throughout the body.

Taken as an orally-ingested liquid form, the products from Quicksilver Scientific bring health practitioners and their patients improved clinical results by providing pharmaceutical-level absorption from their dietary supplement therapies. 

ABOUT QUICKSILVER SCIENTIFIC - www.quicksilverscientific.com 

Popular Quicksilver Scientific products include: Mercury Tri-Test, metal detoxification kits and protocols, Liposomal Glutathione, Micro-Emulsified Colorado Hemp Oil (CBD oil), NanoMojo Liposomal Adaptogen Blend, Artemisinin Emulsion, and Liposomal GABA with L-Theanine.

To schedule an exclusive interview with Dr. Shade or book him for a keynote, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

To learn more about Quicksilver Scientific and view Dr. Shade's webinars visit www.quicksilveracademy.com

The direct to consumer, retail site – www.PurXpressions.com

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

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